Photo courtesy: www.tourismkelowna.com Photographer Brian Sprout - Picture BC Photo courtesy: www.tourismkelowna.com Photographer Brian Sprout - Picture BC Photo courtesy: www.tourismkelowna.com Photographer Brian Sprout - Picture BC Photo courtesy: www.tourismkelowna.com Photographer Brian Sprout - Picture BC Photo courtesy: www.tourismkelowna.com Photographer Brian Sprout - Picture BC Photo courtesy: www.tourismkelowna.com Photographer Brian Sprout - Picture BC Photo courtesy: www.tourismkelowna.com Photographer Brian Sprout - Picture BC Photo courtesy: www.tourismkelowna.com Photographer Brian Sprout - Picture BC

Kelowna Businesses Stay Busy in the Summer

by Admin 19. August 2016 13:23
 It’s been a busier summer so far than we anticipated – it must be human nature to believe that because school is out and the sun is shining – weakly at times, through the summer rains – that business takes a breather.

On behalf of all our business members, and we have 1300+ of them: we are delighted that the economy is buzzing. Certainly Kelowna streets and highways and beaches reflect good visitor numbers, and locals are getting out and about, too, which means good retail and good news for the service industry.

Speaking of the service industry, we hosted the Chief Economist of Central 1 Credit Union – Helmut Pastrick – at our last Chamber luncheon before taking a summertime break.  Central 1 is the financial trade association for the BC credit union system.

Helmut gave us a very lively and informative commentary on the national and local economic recovery prospects. A few days after he spoke to 120 of our members and non-members here in Kelowna, he presented at the annual Bay Area Economic Summit, in Burlington, Ontario.  He has the national view.

Helmut highlighted Kelowna numbers for our crowd, which was really useful, as so often much of our information is skewed to Vancouver and Toronto. I’ll just touch on a few highlights here, thank you in advance to Helmut:

Employment Trends – recent gains higher in Kelowna than Vancouver or all of BC. Overall, employment remains an issue, as the numbers could be more robust.
Population growth: Kelowna remains the leading CMA (Census Metropolitan Area) in population growth in Canada for three years in a row.
The three top CMA industries in Kelowna over the past year showed up as Construction; Accommodation and Food; and Information, Culture, and Recreation. That aligns perfectly with our key business areas.
Business building and support is a growing business concentration in the Kelowna CMA.
And Helmut said that everyone always wants to hear about housing: where are we, where is it going, will it continue to expand? Certainly there is a cyclical upturn in residential sales in the Kelowna CMA – numbers are up in 2015, and median sales price is up. And the market continues to rise, according to the Okanagan Mainline Real Estate Board: MLS residential sales up, and the average sales price, up. This is accompanied by a shrinking inventory of product for sale; just ask any Kelowna-based Realtor, and you’ll hear the same story. Lots of buyers; not a lot of product.

A final note from Helmut’s presentation, and that is on the economic and housing forecast for the Kelowna area:  Helmut showed us a forecast through 2018:

Employment up 1.5% to 2%
Unemployment dropping from today’s 7.0% to 5.5%
Population, up by 4%
Housing sales up by 5%, a healthier percentage than this year’s 15.8%
Housing starts up by 20%
We were all delighted that Helmut could take the time to bring us the Kelowna Economic snapshot at our luncheon.

On other topics: We were pleased to be invited to present local issues at the Federal Liberal Party of Canada’s Pacific Caucus western meeting at the end of July – a solid opportunity to make our voices and our issues known to the federal governing party; issues of importance to Kelowna, and the Okanagan.

Topics we covered included Kelowna Airport Funding; Invasive Mussels; Credit Card Merchant Fees; Convention Centre; Temporary Foreign Worker Policy; and the Organized Crime Tax Force.  We also revisited the Inter-provincial Sales of 100% Canadian Wine; and Addressing the Doctor Shortage.  (It was a very full agenda!)

Later this month, the Kelowna Chamber is hosting delegates from Kasugai, Aichi Prefecture, Japan.  In April, our Chamber visited Kasugai, along with six other cities across central and southern Japan as part of a partnership/tourism/business trip co-sponsored by the Kelowna-Kasugai Sister City Association.

This reciprocal trip only lasts three days, but the 17 delegates are all “home-staying” with local families, to get a true flavor of life here in the Okanagan. (Our 40 delegates all home-stayed for three days in Kasugai in April.)

Many of the delegates are associated with Chubu University, and our Chamber Day will feature a tour of one of our two post-secondary institutions here, the University of British Columbia Okanagan.  Dr Phil Barker, Associate Vice President Research at UBC Okanagan will host the afternoon tour.

Morning will see some golf at The Harvest Golf Club, a walking tour of Kasugai Gardens and the downtown cultural district and waterfront.  We’ll have business presentations over a lunch at the Chamber. After our afternoon tour of UBC, we’ll tour the BC Fruit Packinghouse, and have a taste of their new Broken Ladder cider (John Shreiner says “they hit it out of the park with taste and aroma”).  Finally, an outdoor BBQ in the sunshine back at The Harvest Golf Club.

There is a lot more going on, but that’s probably enough about us, for now.  We remain busy with event planning for fall, continuing membership growth, and our always great back-and-forth conversations with our many members.  We’re also encouraging staff to take a bit of time off while things are “quieter.” 
 
-KCC 

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Global Backlash: Is it Time to Rethink Our Approach to Trade?

by Admin 28. July 2016 06:29

The overarching theme at last week’s Republican convention was one of anger—fury at government and “a rigged system” and rage at an economy that is supposedly “not working.” But, Donald Trump’s biggest applause came when he slammed trade and immigration (“Build the wall! Build the wall!”).

And yet this is not just an American phenomenon. These themes would have been familiar to the British who voted to exit the European Union or in France, Austria, the Netherlands, Poland, Switzerland, Denmark and Sweden where extreme-right parties are leading in the polls. So why are voters so angry? Have trade and globalization gone too far?

Or maybe not far enough! The graph below shows how incomes have grown over 20 years for people at different levels of the global income distribution. We can see that the bottom 10% saw incomes rise almost 40%, so the world’s poorest are better off. The really big winners came from Asia where China’s urban median income grew by almost 300% while in Indonesia and Thailand, it roughly doubled. The top 1%, of course, did well.

Those who gained the least were in the 80th and 90th percentiles—people in rich countries who are in the lower halves of national income distributions. In the mighty German economy, those folks gained just 7% in real terms over 20 years while the U.S. was essentially flat, and Japan saw incomes decline.

Should we blame trade? Research shows that some workers in the rich world struggled with the rise of China’s exports. Trade creates lots of jobs, but when losses are concentrated in certain sectors or regions, it’s difficult for workers to find other employment.

However, a recent paper by the IMF shows that almost all of the world’s income inequality and working class wage stagnation is driven by technology. This is because the automation of routine work by robotics and computing has increased the demand and price premium on higher skills while reducing opportunities in relatively lower skill sectors. From robot greeters and automated checkouts to self-driving vehicles, this transformation is accelerating.

No one can build a wall that will stop technology from coming, so it’s easier for populist leaders to blame trade and immigration.This is not surprising. In 1824, Thomas MacAulay said, “Free trade, one of the greatest blessings which a government can confer on a people, is in almost every country unpopular.” We’ve been arguing about immigration for just as long even though all the evidence shows that immigration actually raises incomes of native workers.

Protectionism is always bad news for Canada. We have to press ahead with CETA and the Trans-Pacific Partnership while doing a better job explaining the benefits from trade. Building walls is a dead end.

 

-Hendrik Brakel, CCC

Senior Director, Economic, Financial & Tax Policy 613.238.4000 (284) | hbrakel@chamber.ca

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Fail Britannia! What the U.K. Exit Vote Means for Business

by Admin 29. June 2016 06:47

The polls were wrong; the government was wrong and even the bookies were wrong, and now the U.K. has voted to leave the European Union. Back in 2013, Prime Minister Cameron promised a referendum on EU membership to shore up support in the midst of a tough election campaign. It has now exploded in his face as a national calamity. Last Friday, the pound fell to its lowest level in 30 years, and global markets lost $2.1 trillion.

The hardest question in all of this is “Why?” In many ways, it’s like asking why 16 million Americans voted for Donald Trump. Is it partly a protest vote, a symptom of frustration with politicians, globalization and declining family incomes? British motivations are similar: the working class is angry about wages; the EU has always provided a convenient punching bag for politicians, and there is a streak of xenophobia as the migrant crisis got mixed into the debate.

The more important question is “What comes next?” Business hates uncertainty—it becomes paralyzing as investment and hiring decisions are put off indefinitely. For now, the U.K. will remain part of the EU. The Lisbon Treaty allows for a two-year period of negotiations once official departure notice has been given to the EU. But the PM has announced his resignation and has said that a new leader will have to provide notice and take charge of negotiating the terms of departure. This will be excruciating because the British government must then ask for a divorce with bedroom privileges—to exit the EU while maintaining access to trade in the common market, investment, banks and the financial sector, some labour mobility, public procurement, input into regulations, etc.

Why would the European Union go along with that? There is great fatigue with British whining; there is anger at being rejected, and it is very much in Europe’s interest to make the U.K. suffer, lest it create an example that could be emulated by other frustrated member-states. For if the Brexit (British exit) works out well, then why not a Frexit, a Departugal, an Italeave, a Beljump or a Luxembuggeroff? (Thank you Twitter.) Quite seriously, nationalist, anti-EU parties are jubilantly crowing with delight all across the continent. Marine Le Pen, the leader of the Front National, called it a “Victoire de la liberté” and called for an identical referendum in France “ le plus vite possible.” Just 38% of French people view the EU favourably.

This comes at a bad time as Europe had emerged from crisis and was returning to healthy growth. Unemployment was falling, confidence was returning and consumers were spending. With 500 million people and GDP of $18.5 trillion, the EU is the world’s largest economy, so a return to instability and fear will have a depressing effect on the global economy.

For Canada, slower global growth means weaker commodity prices and it means that our largest trading partner in Europe will struggle for years with weak investment and political uncertainty. Of Canada’s $37.7 billion of exports to the EU in 2015, $15.9 billion was destined for the U.K.

The best thing the Government of Canada can do is to press ahead full speed with signing the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) to show our commitment to the European Union. The U.K. may one day cease to be part of the EU, so we should also begin negotiating a new trade agreement with our old friends.

-Hendrik Brakel, KCC

Senior Director, Economic, Financial & Tax Policy 613.238.4000 (284) | hbrakel@chamber.ca 

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No Slowdown for Summer

by Admin 14. June 2016 12:56
This June, at the Kelowna Chamber, it feels like we aren’t even pausing to catch our breath, before forging ahead with more new members, more new programs, more celebrating the conclusion of another successful year’s programming in a range of areas.

We try to work around the end of the school terms, as we know how busy parents and families get: on top of running their businesses or reporting for work, they are attending school sports days, attending graduations, going to arts and culture celebrations at their children’s schools, and volunteering in the schools just before the educational system pauses for its six- to eight-week summer break.

May saw us host or co-host fifteen events for Chamber membership. In June, we are hosting nine events, an all-time June high for us.  Our luncheon features Helmut Pastrick, Chief Economist for Central Credit Union 1, the central financial facility and trade association for the B.C. and Ontario credit union systems.

We co-hosted, with the City of Kelowna, a fascinating panel discussion on how businesses can achieve marketing objectives through support of the arts – making arts a key part of their business plan. Participants include the Okanagan Symphony, artsVest, and a local member and business supporter of the arts, Source Furniture. 

We’re also wrapping up another successful year of our BDO Top Forty Under Forty program; hosted a new member reception at Cactus Club - Banks road; joining with the Uptown Rutland Business Association for an after-hours networking event; hosting a Women’s Leadership Network Inspire Series keynote speaker event; and more.

Oh, by the way, our May 25th golf tournament – our 31st annual – sold out three weeks in advance of the date this year, both golf foursomes, and sponsorships. A new record, welcome, in this our 110th year. Business really appears quite bullish in Kelowna right now.

Speaking of being 110 – we will celebrate that significant milestone in on July 6th, with an open party for all our members, our staff, board and volunteers, and all of our fall Business Excellence Award nominees.  We’re planning an outdoor party at one of Kelowna’s best-loved, and best-sited wineries, Vibrant Vine at Okanagan Villa Estate. Fingers crossed for a sunny afternoon.

It’s been a significant year for us in so many ways, as we prepare to undertake particular tasks over the summer.  With fewer events on the horizon to manage, we can happily turn our attention to some special one-time-only projects ranging from web refresh to looking at our outbound communications, from member needs to new Chamber programs.

There have been times this winter when we’ve felt more like a 24/7 events marketing company than a Chamber. It’s important for all of us to maintain the balance among events (connection), serving our members, advocacy, and all the great work that we are privileged to do year round.

Membership continues to grow as we head into our traditionally quieter summer. Once we’ve celebrated our 110th, staff will start to enjoy their annual vacations with family and friends, and it will be all hands on deck as we pitch in and cover for each other.

All in all, just another (busy) time at the Kelowna Chamber of Commerce – in the most beautiful city in Canada. New statistic just in: Kelowna has more restaurants per capita than any city in the country.  Hmmm. we know what we’ll be doing for part of our summer staycation!
 
-KCC 

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Arts & Business: Synergy for Success

by Admin 6. June 2016 09:17

The City and Kelowna Chamber of Commerce will host a breakfast panel discussion to feed creativity and the bottom line.

Members of the arts and business communities are invited to a panel discussion on Monday, June 13, that will highlight how synergies between arts and business can lead to increased profits, recognition and success.

“How Business Can Utilize the Arts to Better Market their Company” is a $10 breakfast event taking place from 9 – 11 a.m. at the Coast Capri Hotel, co-sponsored by the City of Kelowna and Kelowna Chamber of Commerce.

“Creativity, passion and audience are characteristics shared by arts and business,” says Sandra Kochan, Cultural Services Manager. “Whether it’s corporate team building through making music together, or providing a unique behind-the-scenes art experience to valued clients, business and the arts have synergies that can build great results for everyone.”

“Businesses can spark successful, long-term partnerships that capture the imagination of their customers, and empower their employees and staff to broaden their business horizons to include supporting the arts,” says Caroline Miller, Business Development, Kelowna Chamber of Commerce. “Running a museum or an orchestra or a gallery is a business – and partnering always brings more attention to a business, and more customers and visitors to both parties in the relationship.”

The panel includes representation from the local arts and business communities, and will be moderated by Chris Olsen, known for CTV’s ‘Olsen on Your Side’. The panel will address how the arts can help grow a business, extend or establish a brand, engage customers in new and innovative ways, and much more.

Tickets to this event are available until June 8. For more information and to register, visit www.kelownachamber.org/events.

-KCC 

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Want to make a larger social or environmental Impact? You're not alone

by Admin 19. May 2016 09:18

Social Enterprises, Social Entrepreneurs, Not for profits... they all have one thing in common - they combine business with social goals. But what are the differences?

Or what if you don't identify with these business models, but you are interested in giving back?

Or perhaps your not for profit business model isn't working for your organization anymore?

As the first province in Canada to introduce a hybrid corporation for companies who incorporate community contribution into their business, and the social enterprise sector growing rapidly in BC, it's a good time to start asking these questions. Join us for lunch on Friday, May 27th at the Hotel Eldorado for an interactive panel discussion by four of Kelowna's most knowledgeable 'social enterprisers', as we recognize BC Social Enterprise Month.

Discussion will be moderated by Dr. Kyleen Myrah, Professor of Business at Okanagan College, teaching in the areas of management, marketing and social entrepreneurship.

 

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31st Annual Golf Tournament to see change

by Admin 28. April 2016 14:12

The Annual Kelowna Chamber Golf Tournament is always a fave. This year, the planning committee got together early to implement some fresh ideas.

The tournament has always had a giving component - a couple of different fundraisers going to different charities. The "Pro Takes a Shot" contest is a hole contest, where players can choose to have the course's golf pro take their shot for a small donation. The other contest for charity is a raffle for Westjet tickets. This year the committee has added in a third fundraiser, a 50/50 at dinner. Instead of choosing separate charities for each contest as in the past, the committee will choose one children's charity that all the funds raised will go to support, creating a larger impact!

What else is different this year? Well the course of course! We will be at stunning Harvest Golf Club this year! We are looking forward to the scenery and service that this fabulous Club has to offer.

Another notable improvement this year? We have changed the day of the week this tournament falls on. Instead of cutting into your weekend on a Friday night, this tournament will be on a Wednesday, breaking up the week after a long weekend. The 3rd week of May is shaping up to a pretty stellar week! You might also notice a theme at this year's tournament, but to find out what it is - you'll just have to join us!

Some aspects that won't change - the chance to win quality prizes and the fun times this day always brings! Mark it in your calendar - May 25th!! Oh and if you sign up by May 4th, you'll be entered in a draw for a future round of golf & carts for you and 3 pals at The Harvest! For more details visit: http://www.kelownachamber.org/events/31st-Annual-Kelowna-Chamber-Golf-Tournament-presented-by-Costco-Wholesale--1637/details

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The Business Case for Affordable Housing

by Admin 13. April 2016 11:01

On March 8, the Kelowna Chamber partnered with the Urban Development Institute in Kelowna to host a discussion on ending homelessness and supporting affordable housing. The Chamber sees its role as working with experts in housing and social services to support an end to homelessness.

There are business reasons for being interested in affordable housing. At our discussion in March, data from 2011 was presented by the BC Non-Profit Housing Association that summarized the rental market, the cost of housing, and home ownership. These costs are more than most people can afford. Additionally, current housing stock is aging, and new builds aren’t keeping pace with the demographic trends.

Housing accounts for 23 per cent of BC GDP. If we grow housing, we grow the economy. We recognize that rental housing is critical: it is certainly central for labour mobility and immigration. The magic figure of 30 per cent of income is what people should be spending out of their income, on their housing needs. More than this straps households, and the necessities of food, clothing and transportation fall by the wayside.

The reality of the labour market is that some people make lower wages than others, yet are critical to our labour pool. These workers and community residents need affordable housing, and need it in order to work, to continue to contribute to the economy, and to avoid the risk of becoming homeless.

New housing must be addressed by developers and by municipal governments, among others. Pathways include unlocking land – with a look at federal, provincial and municipal policies, and removing barriers to change; design and innovation in mixed use or modular construction; operations and maintenance to keep running costs affordable; and finally financing needs to be barrier-free.

These requirements and needs intersect with the business plans and practices of many of our members. We want these members all to be aware and working on solutions that will enhance their own success.

Homelessness costs the Canadian economy $8 billion annually.

Is homelessness solvable? Yes. For instance, during the 2003 fires in Kelowna, a system was mobilized that incorporated strong local leadership, emergency response, multiple system coordination, and housing that was focused on community mobilization.

The same type of plan could be designed to end homelessness, and help deal with the overall problem. At the same time, creating such a plan will assist municipal and provincial planners to assist in ensuring that the people working in the Kelowna job market are able to better manage their income, and their housing finance outlays, especially at critical points in their work lives.

There is another side to homelessness that has implications for business: the expenditure of tax dollars to band-aid solve a chronic problem. The cost of social services, of mental health interventions, in some cases prison, of emergency rooms, hospital stays, and other physical and mental rehabilitation programs – not to mention short-term housing care – definitely adds up. These are social tax dollars that our businesses pay out as part of doing business in Kelowna.

By shifting our focus to prevention and solutions, we build a better community, re-direct tax dollars to more effective programs that have true long-term resonance in the community, and overall, improve the business and residential environment.

This shift in focus from crisis to solution can only build a stronger work setting. Numerous ongoing initiatives are already in place, and with a concerted effort at coordination, these initiatives will continue the good work already underway in Kelowna to address the problem.

Councillor Luke Stack says that with funding secured by previous Mayors and Councils, four social housing projects — the Cardington Apartments on St. Paul Street downtown, Willowbridge, operated by the Canadian Mental Health Association, the NOW apartment building in South Pandosy and Rutland's Newgate Apartments run by the John Howard Society — all became part of the City’s social housing fabric.

Provincially, former Premier Gordon Campbell called for mayors to address the ongoing problem of homeless, and “get serious”. Kelowna’s Mayors Gray, Shepherd and Basran all have played their parts in doing this. There is also a Kelowna Housing Opportunities Fund that encourages new affordable housing. This program should be ongoing, and function hand in hand with developers. In closing, affordable housing can help Kelowna remain a hub for all types of businesses, both well-established and start-up; can help workers in the service industry find stability on lower incomes; and can overall help businesspeople manage their staffs, their HR needs, and their community contributions toward fixing this systemic need.

-KCC 

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Help future generations trace your Family Tree

by Admin 6. April 2016 10:39

Anyone who has ever tried tracing their family tree knows what a thrill it is to find the names of their ancestors on official documents. It can be like finding a needle in a haystack or striking gold.

One of the best sources of official information is the census. Censuses have been used for centuries to record information about mothers, fathers, children, and peoples’ ways of life, income and occupations. To see the name, address and profession of an ancestor who lived a hundred years ago or more can be quite exhilarating.

The first census in Canada was conducted by Jean Talon, a civil administrator, in 1666. The census counted all 3,215 inhabitants of European descent and logged their age, sex, marital status and occupation. Talon conducted the census to gather information that would help plan and develop the colony.

In fact, Talon was so committed to the process that he collected much of the information personally, visiting settlers throughout the colony. The rest, as they say, is history, Canadian history. The census has evolved over time into the modern census we have now that takes place every five years. This year marks the 350 year anniversary of the first census.

To make it easier for your descendants to trace their family tree 100 years from now (census records are kept sealed for 92 years), jot down May 2 in your calendar this year. You will be receiving a package in the mail inviting you to complete the census online or on paper.

The 2016 Census is mandatory for all Canadians. Three in four households will receive a short-form census, while one out of four will receive the long-form census. The only difference between the two is more detailed questions in the long-form, about things like citizenship and immigration status, birthplace of parents, education, income, housing, child care and other support payments and employment history.

-KCC 

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Selected Site for new Kelowna Visitor Centre something to be proud of

by Admin 30. March 2016 07:38
Kelowna with its sprawling landscapes, impressive infrastructure, outdoor art displays and public parks, is an attractive place to be.  As residents, we know this and may take it for granted, but for first time visitors who aren't aware of everything our vibrant and diverse city has to offer, our Visitor Centre is often the place they go for guidance.  
 
The location of the current centre is no longer appropriate, with new statistics indicating that tourists seek information online and in peak foot traffic areas. Having shared the building at the current location with Tourism Kelowna since the mid-1980s, we have seen the decline of visits to the centre.
 
The new site and facility that Tourism Kelowna has selected in partnership with the City of Kelowna is sure to enhance our local economy in many ways. The location and accessibility is on-par with the current trends and much more suited to today's tourist. It will effectively speak to Kelowna's offerings as it will be situated in the "heart of it all". Marketing dollars and efforts will reach further, as staff will not have to refer to a brochure or map when describing the waterfront, beaches and marina. More personal contact with the visitor centre staff and volunteers will entice tourists to stay longer, to visit more attractions, and to spend more at our local businesses.
 
The new 5,000 square foot building will provide Tourism Kelowna with much-needed counter space to provide service to visitors and platform to feature Kelowna's attractions to a greater number of tourists. There will be more room for increased foot traffic as tourists check out interactive displays, shop local goods, and help themselves to brochures and marketing materials.
 
On behalf of the Kelowna Chamber of Commerce, we congratulate and support the new Visitor Centre Site. We believe this has been a long time coming and is a necessary step to set the stage for a heightened profile and level of success for the vibrant future of tourism in Kelowna. Let's give Kelowna a Visitor Centre to be proud of.
 
-KCC 

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